English Toolkit 2e wins Secondary Reference Resource at EPAA 2016!

Organised by the Australian Publisher’s Association (APA), the Educational Publishing Awards Australia (EPAA) celebrate excellence and innovation in educational publishing. We are thrilled to announce that Macmillan Education’s English Toolkit 2nd Edition was recognised as category winner for Secondary Reference Resource for 2016. Here’s what the judges said: “The English Toolkit is a successful grammar…

Continue reading...

Win-win activities and the confidence game

Guest blogger: Anna McHugh If you read my post on the difference between marking and correcting, you might feel this is an about-face. But as we’re constantly telling students, the art of teaching is knowing which of your tools to deploy, and when. Corrections-style engagement with students’ work is useful when you’re improving grammar, style,…

Continue reading...

Teaching from the back, leading from the front

Guest blogger: Anna McHugh Let’s be honest: you’ve got to nurture your authority as the subject expert, even if you’re proud to be at ease with saying ‘I don’t know, let’s find out.’ Students must believe that we’re the experts, at least in most of the material we’re teaching. So writing your own example answers…

Continue reading...

Book launch: Inspired English at the NGV

Macmillan Education has worked with the National Gallery of Victoria to produce a new resource called Inspired English. This unique project-based series uses very special works of art from the NGV’s catalogue as a springboard for the development of a whole range of English skills, along with creative writing and critical thinking.  On Thursday 21st…

Continue reading...

Marking vs correcting: help students really need

Guest blogger: Anna McHugh Grammar is a bit like train-spotting: you either get excited by it or you don’t. Either way, you can’t deny that it’s the single biggest area of difficulty for most students. Teaching grammar (along with wide reading) is at the core of our job. So when we resort to writing watch…

Continue reading...

The differentiation game: helping students to help you

Guest blogger: Anna McHugh Differentiation is becoming the buzzword of teaching as teaching authorities increasingly acknowledge that the diversity in our classrooms needs something more than the ‘one size fits all’ approach. Differentiation can mean a couple of things: Designing different levels of task for students who need support or extension. Factoring in ‘multiple intelligences’…

Continue reading...

English: What is it good for?

During the first week of Term 1 we tend to sort students into types: Keen ‘N Able; Willing But Weak; Present in Body Only, and Nemesis. We work out how many are excited about subject English and try to teach to them. It’s disheartening when students project apathy, suspicion, and sometimes downright frustration about English. Sometimes we kick off by justifying our subject’s relevance in terms of great stories, the need to think critically, the importance of expression.

Continue reading...

Anne Mitchell on writing her English Workbooks series

I can’t believe that it’s been over ten years since my first book appeared – Senior English Workbook (Macmillan, 2002). Some teachers might remember it. Actually, I still use some of the material and activities from it in my teaching! I am really pleased that the success of the English Workbook series for Years 7 to 10 led to Macmillan’s request for a third edition, and I think that teachers who have liked the previous books will like these ones even more.

Continue reading...